Expanding Ancestral Food Horizons: Pigs’ Feet Gelatin Broth

Recently, I’ve been expanding my ancestral food horizons.

It started with the raw, fermented sauerkraut.

Then I moved on to brewing my own kombucha.

After that, I incorporated a mineral rich bone broth (of the beef variety),

and now I’m into some serious pigs feet.

As in, I made a gelatin rich broth from some local, pastured pigs feet.

There is this amazing little freezer in the meat section of my local Whole Foods.

It’s always full of offal surprises.

Offal, yet totally delicious and nutritious.

Once there was a grass-fed beef liver sale.

Once there were beef bones, which I used to make my first batch of broth.

The second time I went back for bones, there were none cow bones. None. Only pigs’ feet.

So, of course, I bought some.

I put my two pounds of pigs feet into my slow cooker along with 4 Quarts of cold, filtered water, 2 Tbsp Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar and 1 tsp sea salt (a recipe based on the Balanced Bites Crew’s)

With the slow cooker set on high, I waited for the mix to boil. Once it was boiling, I reduced the heat to Low and simmered for about 2 hours. (For more detailed instructions, check out this post by Liz Wolfe (CaveGirl Eats) on Steve’s Original)

After all of that simmering, I removed the pigs feet, and poured the broth through a cheese cloth to strain it.

It’s now sitting in my fridge, in a lovely gelatinous state, waiting to be consumed.

Drinking gelatin broth is a great way to ensure you’re getting some important amino acids. Broth of all kinds was/is a staple in most thriving, “primitive” cultures.

This gelatin broth is high in proline and glycine, which are non-essential amino acids.

Non-essential because our bodies have the ability to make them, but according to some experts, the non-essential-ness is questionable.

There are some wonderful things that come with proline and glycine. You need an abundance of these amino acids in order to take advantage of their diverse benefits.

Proline has been linked by some studies to more youthful skin.

Forget botox or collagen injections, just drink some gelatin broth.

In her article “Why Broth is Beautiful,” Dr. Kaayla T. Daniel calls glycine a “conditionally essential amino acid.”

Glycine has been linked to better:

  • Detoxification of the liver
  • Wound healing
  • Protein digestion by enhancing gastric acid secretion.

The gelatin in my pigs’ feet broth is often recommended to people who suffer from IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) because it has the power to soothe the gastrointestinal tract, balance digestive enzymes and support the healing of gut dysbiosis (an imbalance of good and bad gut flora).

I’ve been drinking one coffee mug of broth in the mornings for the past few days. I just scoop some out, and let it sit at room temperature for a bit to liquefy.  As this batch of broth is not particularly flavorful, I’ve been slurping mine through a straw.

While I think it will take more than a few days of broth drinking to reap the benefits, I’ve definitely felt an immediate difference in my digestion–less gurgle gut.

Have you ever made your own broth? Gelatin or mineral? What changes have you noticed since incorporating broth into your diet? Feel free to share in the comments section below!

About Allison

Allison is a Certified Holistic Health and Nutrition Counselor. She specializes in empowering individuals through 1 to 1 Health Counseling Programs to cultivate a carefree relationship with food, and to have more vibrant, natural energy by transitioning to a whole food, often Paleo, diet. DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I occasionally may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. However, I only recommend products or services I believe in and trust.

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2 Responses to Expanding Ancestral Food Horizons: Pigs’ Feet Gelatin Broth

  1. Scott Ewingcewing December 12, 2013 at 12:59 PM #

    Next time, roast your pigs feet first @ 425 degrees for thirty minutes, flipping halfway through. Also add about 2 cups of mirepoix & and some whole peppercorns to the mix. This will really boost the flavor! Finally, google this: fergus henderson trotter gear

    • Allison December 13, 2013 at 9:50 AM #

      Roasting the pigs feet is a GREAT idea! Thanks so much!

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